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Rightscorp Rakes in More Clients for Pirate Pursuit - New Agreements with Sony and Crowell Law Firm, and Patent Approval in Australia
October 8, 2015
Amanda Marie
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We’ve written numerous times already about Rightscorp and their ongoing effort to protect the rights of copyright holders. Now the company which so far has failed to show any profit for their intermediary action between its clients and the ongoing pursuit for alleged copyright infringers, has signed a contract to represent Sony. The company was also granted approval for their anti-piracy patent for use in protecting copyrights in Australia. In addition to that recent news, Rightscorp has also signed an agreement to work with Carl Lowell, of Crowell Law Firm. All of these new ventures for the company demonstrate that despite massive losses on their bottom line, their clientele keeps growing and expanding globally.

Commonly being referred to now as "the copyright police," a recent form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, shows that Rightscorp entered into an agreement with Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC on September 29, 2015. BMG and Warner already have agreements with the company.

Self-described on their website, the company states, "Rightscorp is a leading provider of monetization services for artists and holders of copyrighted Intellectual Property (IP). The Company's patent pending digital loss prevention technology focuses on the infringement of digital content such as music, movies, software, and games and ensures that owners and creators are rightfully paid for their IP. Rightscorp implements existing laws to solve copyright infringements by collecting payments from illegal file sharing activities via notifications sent through Internet Service Providers (ISPs). The Company's technology identifies copyright infringers, who are offered a reasonable settlement option when compared to the legal liability defined in the Digital Millennium Copyrights Act (DMCA). Based on the fact that 24% of all Internet traffic is used to distribute copyrighted content without permission or compensation to the creators, Rightscorp is pursuing an estimated $2.3 billion opportunity and has monetized major media titles through relationships with industry leaders.” It’s obvious that someone working for the company isn’t doing very well in keeping up with the growing list of clients.

In a September 29th press release, Rightscorp announced an agreement with Crowell Law in Salem, Oregon. If the name Crowell sounds familiar it should, Carl D. Crowell has worked closely with Dallas Buyers Club and other companies pursuing alleged copyright infringers.

In just the same proud manner that has followed all of the previous press releases, Christopher Sabec, CEO of Rightscorp stated, "Carl Crowell and Crowell Law are highly adept at intellectual property matters and have won many cases for the studios and clients they represent. Crowell has been recognized by the courts for his successful targeting of the worst offenders that illegally download films and TV shows to make sure they are held accountable for their actions with dozens of judgments and injunctions against infringers. This agreement will be beneficial to both parties and our clients and we hope with our continued efforts to see an increase in public awareness and recognition of the problems with online piracy and greater respect and appreciation for the value and work of the artists we represent."

And the most recent news of all is that Rightscorp was granted patent approval for use of their copyright protection in Australia, indicating even more global expansion for the company. An October 7th announcement states, "Rightscorp, a leading provider of data and analytic services to support artists and owners of copyrighted property, announced that the Australian Commissioner of Patents has granted Australian Patent 2012236069, for Rightscorp's "System to Identify Multiple Copyright Infringements". The patent will expire April 2, 2032.” This grants Rightscorp full permission to now chase alleged copyright infringers in Australia.

Sabec also added, "There is a tremendous need in Australia for content protection. Our proven technology is effective, making it an ideal solution for artists and copyright holders in every region. Australia has been plagued by infringement over the years and is now taking key initiatives to curb piracy. We believe our technology will be an invaluable asset to the Australian entertainment industry."

Rightscorp is currently tangled up in their own legal battles with Cox Communications, and is facing a class action lawsuit for use of robocalls. The company often uses a threatening and scare tactic approach to alleged copyright infringers, and what used to be a settlement charge of $20.00 per infringement is now $30.00 in many instances.

With the company consistently showing no profit, many are wondering if Rightscorp will be forced to file for bankruptcy in the near future.


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