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P2P News Briefs for This Week
March 7, 2008
Thomas Mennecke
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Unlike the last few weeks which were dominated by BitTorrent and the FCC, this week's news was dominated by BitTorrent, the FCC, and Nine Inch Nails. For good measure, the MPAA's tales of piracy woe were further dampened, as the latest revenue statistics point to a banner year in 2007.

Monday, March 3rd

isoHunt, embattled with the MPAA over copyright infringement, posted a new milestone on Monday. The Canadian based BitTorrent indexing site cataloged its 1 millionth torrent file, just one week after a massive feature upgrade which allows users to gauge the quality of torrent files.

BitTorrent also made news with the iPhone and iTouch, as a rudimentary implementation of the protocol has been released. The developers warn not to use the client on AT&T's EDGE network, rather, they implore users to associate it with the device's built in WIFI adapter. While primitive at best, it's an impressive feat and perhaps a glimpse into what the mobile computer market may bear.

Tuesday, March 4th

The mobile broadband market is finally heating up, although prices still remain rather expensive. Comscore released a new study which found that mobile broadband use jumped ~150% from 2006 to 2007. In other words, only about 850,000 computers had a mobile connection, while in 2007, over 2007 connected in this manner. This type of connection doesn't include WIFI. Instead, Comscore only looked at those using signals provided by cellular carriers such as Verizon's EVDO network or AT&T's EDGE network. If you have over $60 a month to spare, this service might just fulfill that “must be connected” sensation.

The BitTorrent news site TorrentFreak reported that NINs uploaded a number of works to both private and public tracking sites such as The Pirate Bay, What.cd and waffles.fm. The news was confirmed by NIN's Art Director Rob Sheridan.

“We use torrents ourselves, and we know that most NIN fans are tech-savvy and familiar with file-sharing, so we want to experiment with ways to use that to our advantage, instead of making the mistake of trying to fight or ignore it, as so many artists and labels do.” NIN’s Rob Sheridan told TorrentFreak. "Many sites, too are willing to work with artists with programs such as Mininova’s content distribution platform and What.cd’s ‘Vanity House’.

Wednesday, March 5th

If you were hoping for a new FCC hearing into Comcast's "delaying" tactics used to slow down BitTorrent uploads, it looks like it's not going to happen. According FCC chairman Kevin Martin, Comcast's strategy of paying people to stand in line and absorb seats is apparently no biggie.

"It's usually more interesting for people to attend on their own without being paid to do so, but we're not investigating anything," F.C.C. Chairman Kevin Martin said.

Remember when the MPAA got its figures all wrong about the impact college students have on piracy? Well, it seems that overall, piracy isn't hurting the movie industry that much either. In fact, the music industry can only dream of the MPAA's accomplishments in 2007, as it had a record year with revenue totaling over 9 billion dollars. Not bad considering that online movie distribution has only become more ubiquitous in the last 3 years.

Thursday, March 6th

Hot on the heels of their latest success against Danish ISP Tele2, the IFPI has successfully enforced another block, this time against the Israeli BitTorrent site HttpShare.com. If their success of blocking The Pirate Bay is any indication of how progress will be measured against HttpShare.com, fans of this site probably have little to worry about, other than rectifying how Chinese policy can exist in a democratic nation.

Friday, March 7th

Rep. Howard Coble (R-N.C.) posted an op-ed piece on "The Hill" today, with the apparent intention of informing people on the inherent dangers that P2P technology places on our identities. We all know that people share information they shouldn't, such as bank statements, credit card information, and social security number. This information can easily be trolled for, and allow a person to steal another's identity. But Rep. Coble, how do you feel on the issue?

"Many of these sites and software that can be downloaded from the Internet allow the illegal “swapping” or “sharing” of music and movies. If you acquired music or movies online illegally, you may be setting yourself up to have your identity stolen."


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File-Sharing/P2P Related :: Other

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