Slyck.com
 
Slyck Chatbox - And More

Life after Death

Discuss Slyck's latest news
Forum rules
PLEASE READ BEFORE POSTING: Slyck Forum Rules

Life after Death

Postby SlyckTom » Mon Feb 27, 2006 5:25 pm

It was either the week from Hell, or just another entertaining week depending on your file-sharing perspective. The MPAA’s (Motion Picture Association of America) war against online unauthorized file-sharing was kicked into high gear, netting the capture of Razorback2; along with several other major online indexing sites.

From a public relation’s standpoint, the MPAA’s online war has been significantly more effective than the RIAA (Recording Industry Association of America.) When the MPAA wishes to be heard, there’s little doubt their message is being delivered. The MPAA uses surgical strikes against file-sharing related entities; specifically targeting those that will yield the most attention.

Razorback2 is a prime example of using specific targeting, which in turn generating a frenzy of attention. This eDonkey2000 indexing server was utilized by over 1 million individuals – many of which went from sharing and caring to panic-stricken in the course of several hours. Anything that affects such a large number of individuals is bound to catch mainstream attention – although accurate depictions of the event were generally rare.

Two days later the MPAA struck once again, this time hitting several indexing sites. Their targets included ISOHunt, TorrentSpy, ed2k-it.com, NZB-Zone.com, BinNews.com, and DVDRs.net. These popular targets elevated an already heightened public relations blitz, especially considering the MPAA’s decision to target Newsgroup indexing sites.

The MPAA’s approach to online piracy is multifaceted, as opposed to the RIAA (Recording Industry Association of America.) One of the MPAA’s goals is to raise awareness, which judging by last week’s activities was accomplished. Although the MPAA does initiate legal enforcement actions against individual file-shares, it does so with considerably less frequency than the RIAA. The RIAA prefers a less structured approach, whereby it targets between 700-800 alleged infringers per month.

There’s little doubt the MPAA’s approach has been many times more successful – at least when it comes to grabbing attention. Few mainstream media outlets ignored the MPAA’s enforcement actions last week. Conversely, the RIAA’s enforcement campaigns, which equal to approximately one per month, have fallen largely on deaf ears. With nameless and faceless individuals targeted, the RIAA’s lawsuit campaign has fallen off the media’s radar.

The significance to this is considerable. With little public attention surrounding the RIAA’s lawsuit campaign, we continue to witness two important events. One, the population of the FastTrack network – where a majority of lawsuit recipients reside – continues to enjoy impressive numbers. Averaging just fewer than 3 million unique users at any given moment, FastTrack users seem to be oblivious to the RIAA’s efforts against this network. Second, the overall population of the P2P community continues to climb upward, with a record 9.5 million unique users in January 2006.

It’s almost as if no one is listening to the RIAA – a perception that indeed is becoming more fact than theory.

This is a trend that may be difficult to reverse for the RIAA, as music file-sharing is vastly different than movie file-sharing. Mainstream individuals looking for music choose such networks as Gnutella or FastTrack. Like the RIAA’s lawsuit recipients, these methods are nameless, faceless, and without community. The demise or long term absence off the developer would go largely unnoticed by mainstream users. How many Kazaa users can articulate the details of Sharman Networks’ current legal battle?

Movie sharing is another ball game. Although not of vital importance, a significant number of movie sharers use indexing sites such as the ones mentioned in last week’s lawsuits. Because of their communal nature, it’s no big secret when MPAA enforcements go down. Razorback2 users didn’t need the latest CNN news flash, and the ISOHunt community knew about the lawsuits before the owners did.

Yet elevating the presence of copyright enforcement efforts is no guarantee of success either. The population of eDoneky2000 and BitTorrent continue to increase despite many high profile enforcment efforts - such as the loss of EliteTorrents and SuprNova. Significant events such as last week’s tirade are not uncommon, and past MPAA enforcements during December of 2004 are considered more momentous. Also important to note, only NiteShadow.com and TorrentBox.com were trackers - the rest being search engines.

The question then becomes, will the MPAA's well placed strikes against file-sharing indexing servers and sites carry enough momentum to turn the tide against unauthorized file-sharing, or will these actions become just another day in the life of P2P?
Follow us on Twitter @SlyckDotCom
Join our Facebook Fan page
SlyckTom
 
Posts: 5713
Joined: Fri Jul 26, 2002 7:22 pm
Location: New York City

Postby firestorm9377 » Mon Feb 27, 2006 5:38 pm

well written article. :D Nothing that happened last week really mattered to me except for IsoHunt. I don't download movies just tv eps. :twisted:
firestorm9377
 
Posts: 148
Joined: Sat Jul 09, 2005 1:44 am
Location: in a box

Re: Life after Death

Postby Dormant707 » Mon Feb 27, 2006 5:39 pm

SlyckTom wrote:The question then becomes, will the MPAA's well placed strikes against file-sharing indexing servers and sites carry enough momentum to turn the tide against unauthorized file-sharing, or will these actions become just another day in the life of P2P?


Nice article Tom.

Of all the sites that were named in the MPAA press release, Niteshdw.com was one that immediately ceased all tracker activity. Niteshdw removed his tracker's link from his forum pretty much the next day, once the news broke. Virtually overnight all available Star Trek torrents are no longer available, and I think that while some of the torrents are still available on other trackers, Star Trek downloads will disappear in the future.

As for the MPAA, I think that the tactics of the MPAA are definitely more effective and also pretty much more aggressive. There is a real intelligence behind the MPAA's campaign and they are clamping down on all forms of activity. The legal team of the MPAA are certainly formidable.
Dormant707
 
Posts: 5067
Joined: Fri Jul 15, 2005 5:03 pm

Postby Leecherâ„¢ » Mon Feb 27, 2006 6:10 pm

I've given up caring. I'll just get on with my life of File-Sharing and not be pestered by those fuckers otherwise known as, MPAA and RIAA.

Oh, and Hi there. I'm new here... :)
Ah, yes...
Leecherâ„¢
 
Posts: 32
Joined: Mon Feb 27, 2006 6:01 pm

Postby altpdend » Mon Feb 27, 2006 6:21 pm

According to isohunt website as far it can tell the lawsuit has not even been filed against them kinda makes me think this all just might be a big pr. stunt. Also makes me wonder how may people are really caught up in the riaa dragnet.
Last edited by altpdend on Mon Feb 27, 2006 6:23 pm, edited 1 time in total.
altpdend
 
Posts: 276
Joined: Wed Dec 01, 2004 1:35 pm

Postby abou105 » Mon Feb 27, 2006 6:23 pm

wow well written article tom good to see you bk, all in all it sums up nicely the events unfolding, although i dont like seeing lawsuits or server/trakers being taken down it is good that i hear about it unfolding so soon and thats thanks to you and the team.
Information is so valuable in todays society, its understandable people want to lock it up, but the internet is about freedom of information, lets not take that away.
User avatar
abou105
 
Posts: 1468
Joined: Sun Jun 15, 2003 4:00 pm
Location: a place in my head

Postby Wham » Mon Feb 27, 2006 6:55 pm

Just a great pitty. What a waste! If you at the MPAA/RIAA want to spend your money foolishly - knock yourselves out. You may put a dent into P2P for a week or so but when you get right down to it, you've lost the war. In my book, it's a loosing proposition. Your money and time would be a lot better spent producing better products and being fair in the prices you charge for selling the products. You ain't going to win against P2P. If people can't find what they are looking for at a realistic price, they are going to turn to P2P.
Wham
 
Posts: 1193
Joined: Sat Mar 27, 2004 1:28 am

Postby Shoe » Mon Feb 27, 2006 7:03 pm

I think the saddest thing about this is that Niteshdw, the most legitimate and community-based of all the sites is the one that has closed. It was a site run by a fan and run for the benefit of fans. Most of whom probably spend a small fortune each year on Spock ears etc.

But then again, if there's ever a group of people with the will and technical knowledge to fight back against such persecution then it's has to be the Trekkies.

Set phasers to kill! ;)
Shoe
 
Posts: 37
Joined: Mon Oct 31, 2005 8:23 pm

Postby RottenFoxBreath » Mon Feb 27, 2006 7:15 pm

god bless em,if they got rid of star trek torrents..it has to be the worst series ever.
*dons flame proof suit* :lol:
User avatar
RottenFoxBreath
 
Posts: 185
Joined: Mon Jul 04, 2005 6:02 pm
Location: Scotland

Postby MrFredPFL » Mon Feb 27, 2006 7:32 pm

lol fox - go ahead, call me dweeb - but i was a major fan of the original. when TNG came out, i was less than impressed, altho it had its moments. the subsequent spinoffs make the words "horrifyingly bad" seem hollow ;)

an open letter to Majel Roddenberry:

please, let Gene rest in peace. be happy with the residuals, and put this puppy to bed now.
MrFredPFL
 
Posts: 15753
Joined: Wed Aug 17, 2005 4:48 pm

Postby BasicTek » Mon Feb 27, 2006 7:35 pm

RottenFoxBreath wrote:god bless em,if they got rid of star trek torrents..it has to be the worst series ever.
*dons flame proof suit* :lol:


A loss of any torrent site or for that matter any filesharing site should be mourned. It's all fun and games until your favorite filesharing site gets hit. Then OMFG!!! :shock: :shock: :shock:
"The government, which was designed for the people, has got into the hands of the bosses and their employers, the special interests. An invisible empire has been set up above the forms of democracy." - Woodrow Wilson
User avatar
BasicTek
 
Posts: 1610
Joined: Sat Jun 04, 2005 12:59 pm
Location: Somewhere warm

Re: Life after Death

Postby irish » Mon Feb 27, 2006 7:50 pm

SlyckTom wrote:It’s almost as if no one is listening to the RIAA – a perception that indeed is becoming more fact than theory.


No one is listening to them any longer. Great article Tom :D
User avatar
irish
 
Posts: 1830
Joined: Tue Feb 15, 2005 5:03 pm
Location: Na hOileain Chanaracha

Postby AussieMatt » Mon Feb 27, 2006 8:06 pm

The MPAA also dont target individual fileshareres as much as the RIAA does it prefers to target indexing sites and most site operatators know the legal risks of contributory copytright infringement
AussieMatt
 
Posts: 1044
Joined: Wed Mar 03, 2004 10:03 am

Postby Christopher » Mon Feb 27, 2006 9:31 pm

Wham wrote:Just a great pitty. What a waste! If you at the MPAA/RIAA want to spend your money foolishly - knock yourselves out. You may put a dent into P2P for a week or so but when you get right down to it, you've lost the war. In my book, it's a loosing proposition. Your money and time would be a lot better spent producing better products and being fair in the prices you charge for selling the products. You ain't going to win against P2P. If people can't find what they are looking for at a realistic price, they are going to turn to P2P.


True. Some people, like myself, would be willing to pay them just for the knowing that they wouldn't be downloading something with an unknown virus in it!

That's really all that I am worried about with p2p, and even that isn't much of a worry, because if someone finds out that something has a virus in it, they will post that it has a virus.
I am not as stupid or naive as people would like to believe I am.
Christopher
 
Posts: 829
Joined: Sun Mar 27, 2005 9:43 am

Postby BasicTek » Mon Feb 27, 2006 9:41 pm

Christopher wrote:True. Some people, like myself, would be willing to pay them just for the knowing that they wouldn't be downloading something with an unknown virus in it!


So download/scan then play what's a few extra seconds to be safe??? Viruses should be the least of your worries on P2P.
"The government, which was designed for the people, has got into the hands of the bosses and their employers, the special interests. An invisible empire has been set up above the forms of democracy." - Woodrow Wilson
User avatar
BasicTek
 
Posts: 1610
Joined: Sat Jun 04, 2005 12:59 pm
Location: Somewhere warm

Postby Alex H » Mon Feb 27, 2006 11:04 pm

altpdend wrote:According to isohunt website as far it can tell the lawsuit has not even been filed against them kinda makes me think this all just might be a big pr. stunt.


Is anyone else thinking there something kinda weird and/or wrong about issuing the press release before they've served the documents?

If that's fine to do, then let me announce that I have served a subpoena on the MPAA for being nasty people.

You heard it here first![/b]
Alex H
 
Posts: 329
Joined: Thu Jun 10, 2004 4:02 am

Postby ShawnSpree » Tue Feb 28, 2006 12:34 am

They could of better prepared a tactic of this size. RIAA did it right, they had legal services to scare people over. iTunes, napster.. and bunch others. MPAA needed to set up a online movie store first, and then use the tactic to gain more money. So far their losing money and maybe less stuff is traded, but maybe it went further underground. Given too much time for people to find another way to download movies, without any real revenue.
ShawnSpree
 
Posts: 1293
Joined: Sat May 28, 2005 8:20 pm

Postby voodoohippie » Tue Feb 28, 2006 1:19 am

Many people think that Gnutilla can only be good for Music. They thought wrong.

You don't need special verivied sites, Magnet links, E2K servers to run Edonkey. Just use a good Gnutilla app with secure channels. Well can you say BearShare and I think there are a few others that use a handshake to make sure that the client is a real one.

No p2p is growing and people are getting more smart. If everyone joins together in higher numbers then it will be harder for the MPAA or RIAA to track you as one person in a large group of say 60 million users.
Check out The Legacy Album Rock http://thelegacy.shorturl.com for the best Album Rock, Classic Rock, Progressive Rock More than "Classic Hits"

Start an Internet Radio Station Legally and even stream Audio Ads.
http://startinternetradio.tk
voodoohippie
 
Posts: 458
Joined: Sat Nov 08, 2003 1:52 am

Postby Dormant707 » Tue Feb 28, 2006 2:52 am

Niteshdw's statement on Niteshdw.com:

Niteshdw wrote:
Why is the Internet the next wave of entertainment?


As most of you know, the MPAA posted a press release that claimed a lawsuit against "NiteShadow.com". While this site is not "NiteShadow.com", I want to post my thoughts and feelings about why the media industry is missing out on a huge potential market and is alienating its own customers.

I have not received any notice from Paramount or the MPAA regarding any lawsuit against myself or my website. I can't comment on the lawsuit itself since I have yet to see it.


There is a huge demand in the world for both video and audio in electronic format. People want to be able to put music on their portable audio players, like the iPod, to take with them wherever they want. Even more so, there are people all over the world that don't have any access (over-the-air, cable, or sat) to TV shows and movies. For example, in Australia, the second season of Battlestar Galatica (aired on Sci-Fi) has yet to air on any network. The very popular BBC show "Doctor Who" has never aired on U.S. television, and yet was viewed by 10 million British weekly.

Why should someone in Australia have to wait over a year to see a TV show? Why should an American never be able to watch "Doctor Who" simply because they live in the wrong part of the world? The internet today has the potential to create markets that span the entire world. Some broadcasters have already discovered that they can find much larger audiences via the Internet. The show "The IT Crowd" produced in the UK by Channel 4 released all of their episodes on the internet for viewers DAYS before the show aired on TV.

It only takes a basic understand of economics to understand that where there is demand, there is a market. So far, large corporations have done little, if anything at all, to harness this vast new market. There have been some steps forward with the video iPod and Google Videos, but even at $2 per show, people must pay $50+ for a season of a TV show, which they can readily purchase on DVD for nearly the same price and at much higher quality.

The MPAA's press release dated Feb 23, 2005 states that one website claimed over 4.4 million downloads of the movie "Alien 2". If the industry could have captured just one quarter of those downloads, they could have made millions of dollars in revenue.

When Betamax and VHS were introduced, the media industry claimed that those formats would be the end of entertainment as we knew it. In fact, the VHS allowed the industry to make more money than ever before by distributing videos on VHS. Today's digital video is just the next step. Digital, on-demand, video gives the media the means to reach the entire world overnight.
Dormant707
 
Posts: 5067
Joined: Fri Jul 15, 2005 5:03 pm

Postby put4558350 » Tue Feb 28, 2006 8:36 am

I think about ...

1. using thing like Gnutella or Mute share .torrent
2. using DHT to find source and data (codeing is ok)
3. using End to end end enctyption for data

resut : fast and unknow

edit :

My ideal is just mix best part of every p2p program.

Gnutella , Mute = Tracker less
Torrent = Speed for big file

I think we "NEED" to protect our tracker ... And by having this some company that aim to hurt our tracker by "employ some organize" to stop employ them
... Also if we will save by enctyption.
Last edited by put4558350 on Tue Feb 28, 2006 8:02 pm, edited 1 time in total.
put4558350
 
Posts: 15
Joined: Sun Jun 26, 2005 8:05 pm

Postby Hypnotoad » Tue Feb 28, 2006 9:21 am

So how does Shareprovider manage to stay up? What with servers going down and link sites being hit I am very suprised it has not fallen also.
If I had a suspicious mind i'd be suspicious.. :wink:
User avatar
Hypnotoad
 
Posts: 4555
Joined: Wed Dec 15, 2004 5:14 pm
Location: Bristol UK

Postby squirm » Tue Feb 28, 2006 1:00 pm

If the MPAA actually succeeds in making it much more difficult to download movies, I really won't be too upset. The reason is simple. I believe when purchasing movies, the consumer is receiving a greater value than purchasing music.

On the other end of the spectrum, the RIAA hates their own customers, treats them like criminals and has a long history of killing any new recording devices (DAT, DCC, etc). The labels have even been taken to court for price fixing. Basically, sharing music should be the consumers way of undoing the RIAA's ruthless past and "getting even" with them. I have absolutely no mercy for the RIAA.
squirm
 
Posts: 59
Joined: Tue Feb 24, 2004 3:08 pm

Postby bitz » Tue Feb 28, 2006 1:13 pm

put4558350 wrote:I think about ...

1. using thing like Gnutella or Mute share .torrent
2. using DHT to find source and data (codeing is ok)
3. using End to end end enctyption for data

resut : fast and unknow


Well that is a good idea, maybe not new, but still a good idea.

How much work is it really to use crypto? Technically we could continue using p2p if the shared content was not easily identified and there was a high enough degree of denability.

The only crypto needed for p2p would be protocol encryption, which some bittorrent clients already have so that isp's couldn't easily do traffic shaping.

Anyways for the content itself here is what we would end up with. In addition to nfo's, there could be dat's as well that contain the information needed to merge and then decrypt the shared data files. The data files themselves would have random filenames, in fact the filenames would not really matter and could be changed by the peers often. If keyservers are used then the dat's would not need to contain the decryption key(s). Since we would be using something like pgp or gpg or another standard public key based crypto for the content. As to splitting the content and any compression, content releasers could get as fancy or remain as simple as they want to.

Basically sharing the parts would not require any additional processing. So the only added processing would be the initial packaging and then rebuilding of the shared content.

To anyone downloading the content and rebuilding it, the rebuilding process could be made fairly painless and automated by scripts.

Also this way corruption, fakes and whatever other problems would be very limited and almost eliminated completely.

The p2p clients could even optionally download and share random part files in addition to what they intentionally are sharing as an added measure of protection, either manually or automatically. The part files would not have a set size.

Basically to anyone monitoring the p2p networks, ftp and other such servers, it would look as if the traffic is a snowstorm of random unidentifable data.

I ask you isn't it long past due for them to be left out in the cold, completely clueless?

Anyways the nfo's, dat's and related tools would be fairly small, easy to distribute. Could be hosted and shared in a number of ways. Through private forums, sites, newsgroups, irc, jabber and anonymous networks. Even the generally most expensive overhead and slow performance of many anonymous networks would not be too much for sharing these tiny files. Heck they could even be hidden in images or other small files using stegnography.

Imagine putting up a website that has just a image. Visitors would take that image process it using automated tools and p2p clients, then locally open the real site. The webserver load would be very low and if the site was taken down it could easily and quickly resurface on thousands of random webservers.

Also besides the filesharing security, peers could certainly use local security such as filesystem encryption, truecrypt and whatever else.

Basically making it very hard and costly to go after anyone. 8)
bitz
 
Posts: 237
Joined: Sat Dec 18, 2004 6:40 pm

Postby Fez » Tue Feb 28, 2006 1:35 pm

Good article ST...it ties up a lot of other discussions in one nice, tight package...

It’s almost as if no one is listening to the RIAA – a perception that indeed is becoming more fact than theory.


This has been the case basically since the beginning...I would compare them to the ongoing screams of a spoiled child that is being ignored by everyone around them. :wink:

This is a trend that may be difficult to reverse for the RIAA, as music file-sharing is vastly different than movie file-sharing


I agree with this for a number of reasons, not the least of which being I am still willing to buy a movie on dvd IF it is well made, reasonably priced, contains bonus features such as director's cuts or extras, etc., whereas you couldn't pay me to buy a cd anymore.

The fact that for years the entertainment industry got away with charging the same amount for a cd of ten mediocre tracks as they did for a three hour "blockbuster" movie on dvd with all the extras is now coming back to bite the RIAA in the ass. The fact that the MPAA has been far more discretionary, while not less forceful, with its "education" campaign probably has not hurt their cause either.

Face it RIAA...YOU BLEW IT!!!...and now you are reaping what you have sown...too bad for you. :roll:
User avatar
Fez
 
Posts: 1435
Joined: Wed Oct 01, 2003 10:26 am
Location: Great White North

Re: Life after Death

Postby Fartingbob » Tue Feb 28, 2006 2:58 pm

dannybhoi wrote:Virtually overnight all available Star Trek torrents are no longer available, and I think that while some of the torrents are still available on other trackers, Star Trek downloads will disappear in the future.

I disagree. many people will have downloaded them, they will all just move to public trakcers (in the short term) and i wouldnt be surprised if a private tracker specialising in trek or other sci fi programs becomes the clear star trek tracker of choice.
User avatar
Fartingbob
P2P Trafficker
 
Posts: 13248
Joined: Sun Nov 20, 2005 4:18 pm
Location: Serenity

Next

Return to Slyck News

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests

© 2001-2008 Slyck.com