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Sharman Exterminating Kazaa Lite K++

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Postby Guest » Mon Dec 08, 2003 9:18 am

Recent upgrades to Kazaa clients (2.5 and higher) make them less tolerant with outdated or non official clients such as Kazaa Lite K++. Kazaa Lite is based on a version prior to 2.5, therefore a current supernode will not accept its shares. Although this will cause network headaches in terms of traffic, the client will not be able to participate or download off the main FastTrack network. This will effectively cluster and isolate all modified Kazaa clients from FastTrack.


so klk++ will disapear from the network.. but i remember an option in K++ 2.10 (or so... anyway an old version..) that you can set your own version number.. so can't we set our version number to 260?? btw RN is this option also in the latest version??
Guest
 

Postby Giovanni » Mon Dec 08, 2003 10:56 am

OK Kazaa Lite users will be clustered and isolated. What wrong with that?

There must be Kazaa lite supernodes already.

It will not be that hard to get more users to become supernodes and we have a whole new network!!

A network with a better client than the official KaZaA.

This may be the end of Sharman's own KaZaA!
Giovanni
 

Postby Doobie » Mon Dec 08, 2003 1:14 pm

Obviously, FastTrack is giving time for existing Kazaa users to upgrade before kicking off all the old clients (including Kazaa lite).

Anyone using Kazaa lite will eventually give up on it as the little Kazaa lite world, where member has a perfect participation score, shrinks and dies.

Actually, there's no reason a new Kazaa lite won't appear. It will just be harder to find as FastTrack hounds the search engines and the mirrors to make Kazaa lite vanish.

On the other hand, I don't have any real interest here. I don't use Kazaa or Kazaa lite.
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Postby dogmeat » Mon Dec 08, 2003 1:26 pm

If they manage to block K++ users, I can imagine one thing happening. There will be less quality files on the network. The average KaZaA user doesn't know how to rip DVD or CDs. They also don't know about the spyware. Those that do know about the spyware are much more skilled with their computers and are a major source of the files found on the network. I have no doubts that Sharmen will fail. The RIAA hates them for making it easy for the masses to fileshare and the collective masses of the internet hate spyware. That lady that runs the show over there is enough reason for me not to like them. She comes off as a mircle cure dealer. She has some utopian idea that she can make p2p so artists get paid and she makes money. The point of p2p is so that we don't have to pay to download. I'm never going to pay to download. Even if I did, it wouldn't be from something like p2p where the quality is questionable. They can't control the content and they can't control what client users choose to connect with.

Maybe she's just using media hype to raise the stock value and funnel capital into some dummy company. Once the bottom falls out they declare bankruptcy, screw the investors and live out their retirement.
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Postby unknown » Mon Dec 08, 2003 1:28 pm

At least I have a copy of the program before they took it off.
unknown
 

Sharman may change fastrack to shake off leech apps

Postby Guest » Mon Dec 08, 2003 1:31 pm

In the recent article about "Poisoned", Julian Ashton mentioned that the Sharman management invited him to Estonia to meet the "fastrack development team".

This seems to mean to me that the original developers, which Sharman claimed were not involved to the California Court, are now re-involved. With their re-involvement, the fastrack protocol and Kazaa user interface can now be re-worked to get rid of apps that have reverse engineered it.

Otherwise, it doesn't do much good to get rid of KazaaLite because the same app will just appear as open source that anyone can compile, use and or distribute.
Guest
 

Postby origin » Mon Dec 08, 2003 8:03 pm

During any point in time in the p2p world there is some network witch holds the crown basiclly the most popular and resourcefull app out. But like most other things in life they never stay on top forever, they reach a point where the sky is limit and down they come and shure enough another app replaces its place then soon as it's time is up another will come and so on the process repeats. So I will weap the beginning of the
eventual demise of the FT network because it was a good resourse to have on hand. But this is one of the brilliant things that makes p2p so great once a big time network is knocked off by some greedy rich corp./org 5 new apps pop up, so for all of those who appose the aprawling of sharing information over the net cannot keep up, they can only slow the reveloution down at BEST but NEVER stop it. :D

I've been over at ZP for a long time, just thought I ought to join this forum also it looks awesome, and people seem to have a lot to speak on there minds HEALTHY conversation the languadge of the wise man.

l8
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Postby mr blobby » Mon Dec 08, 2003 8:27 pm

the good thing about kazaa and kazaalite fastrack, is that the network seems to attract most of the attention of the media, virus spreaders, fake filers , noobs with no files. and all that type of thing.

which is great! as that keeps the better networks like ed2k overnet etc working great with all the best files, out of the limelight.


so, i dont care what happens to k-lite, kazaa as long as it keeps on attracting most of the attention.
mr blobby
 

Re: Sharman Exterminating Kazaa Lite K++

Postby Sharman litle helper » Mon Dec 08, 2003 8:55 pm

How abought?
First I'm very sory my bad english please ...
But Sharman networks have money for ads. What abought if we all help Sharman to get more money and hapy customers... We must greate db of all Kazaa MD's ads and then we start download everything. We send everything what we dovnload back to the advertiser whit note at they shud pay more because Sharman is so Good. :lol: Why we must send everything back? We dont want to use wrong Sharmans good will :roll: .

I can put this work one 100Mb/s and I think at if we all do the best Sharman comes wery hapy and wery ritch. Of course we don't want any harm Sharman :twisted:
Sharman litle helper
 

Postby dogmeat » Mon Dec 08, 2003 8:58 pm

KaZaA was never a good program and FastTrack has too many problems to have ever been concidered very resourceful. Those two have been popular despite their failings, but it doesn't give either of them a "crown". The popularity of KaZaA has more to due with its marketing approach, not its usefulness. They targeted the novice users and they are of course the largest population on the internet.
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So... much money to be made here....

Postby hektor the iquana » Mon Dec 08, 2003 10:29 pm

i look over all this stuff and i say to myself, there is more money here than in all the mines of south amerika and afrika combined and not one of these idiots see the potential.. give the user everything he wants, charge him some money, make the product easy to use, provide a killer network, and you will make more money than 2 bill gates.. i just cant believe the blindness all around me....
hektor the iquana
 

Postby Guest » Mon Dec 08, 2003 11:02 pm

mr blobby wrote:which is great! as that keeps the better networks like ed2k overnet etc working great with all the best files, out of the limelight.


While I don't agree that the FT network is as good as it can be, it's definitely not a bad network. I've tried your superior networks, such as ed2k (eMule) and it's not fun having to wait for 2000+ other people to finish their downloads before I can start mine. Now I don't know much about the ed2k network, but it does seem to me that the clients connect to every source possible and that that's the reason for the long queues. Kazaa only connects to max 8 different sources per file and that's why you don't see these big queues on the FT network. You shouldn't have to wait for days to download small files, which I've had to do when I've tested eMule.
Guest
 

1010101010

Postby Guest 1011010101 » Mon Dec 08, 2003 11:44 pm

Anonymous wrote:
mr blobby wrote:which is great! as that keeps the better networks like ed2k overnet etc working great with all the best files, out of the limelight.


While I don't agree that the FT network is as good as it can be, it's definitely not a bad network. I've tried your superior networks, such as ed2k (eMule) and it's not fun having to wait for 2000+ other people to finish their downloads before I can start mine. Now I don't know much about the ed2k network, but it does seem to me that the clients connect to every source possible and that that's the reason for the long queues. Kazaa only connects to max 8 different sources per file and that's why you don't see these big queues on the FT network. You shouldn't have to wait for days to download small files, which I've had to do when I've tested eMule.



Actually thats only the default setting you can change that to a max of 40 users.
And there are queues on kazaa it's just the program doesnt show them.
Guest 1011010101
 

Re: 1010101010

Postby Guest » Tue Dec 09, 2003 12:36 am

Guest 1011010101 wrote:Actually thats only the default setting you can change that to a max of 40 users.
And there are queues on kazaa it's just the program doesnt show them.


Yes with K++ you can change the number of sources to 40 (and even more), but the original FT network code doesn't try to connect to every single source it finds and that's why I've never had to wait for days to download a small file except for very very rare files. With eMule I've had to wait for days for even pretty popular files.
Guest
 

Postby Guest » Tue Dec 09, 2003 12:49 am

Shoot maybe this will keep the RIAA away if everyone on K-Lite acts as a Supernode woot woot this could be the best news ever. This will keep the lamers off of Kazaa Lite and man is it gonna be fun.

Voodoohippie
Guest
 

Postby Guest » Tue Dec 09, 2003 2:03 am

Wouldn't it be funny if it turns out that only 10% of the users on Fasttrack use the regular Kazaa client. I'm pretty sure the actual percentage is 50% or less so the orphaned Kaxaa Lite FT network would actually be bigger than the Regular Kazaa Lite FT network. So how come the original Morpheus clients couldn't connect to each other when they we're kicked off Fasttrack?
Guest
 

Postby Guest » Tue Dec 09, 2003 3:09 am

Anonymous wrote:So how come the original Morpheus clients couldn't connect to each other when they we're kicked off Fasttrack?


Maybe because Morpheus didn't have the FT supernode code, or more likely, it had code checking if it was still allowed to connect to the network. There are packets sent from supernodes to clients with network config and it was probably one such packet sent to all clients and supernodes that put an end to Morpheus' days as an FT client. This package is also saved in the registry, which could be why they claimed Kazaa remotely changed their users' registry.
Guest
 

Postby HeWhoThinksTooMuch:) » Tue Dec 09, 2003 6:42 am

As I see it there are two options to this situation:

1) Let Kazaa Lite K++ rest in peace.
K++ may give me faster download speed than eMule Plus, but I prefer to wait a couple of days for a movie that I can actually watch over downloading a movie in 5-10 hours just to see it dissapear from my harddrive when the download is complete! M$ can get away with selling programs with serious bugs and still survive; this is a luxury that a freeware program cannot afford and it will suffer a silent death if it tries the same.

2) Give Sharman a dose of their own medicine.
Provided that the "delete large files after download" feature can be removed from K++ then it could resurrect with a new name e.g. KaPow (KaPow in your face, Sharman) with the mission to take over the FT network!

As mentioned in several earlier posts there are four very interesting assumptions (which I believe are true) that would eventually enable KaPow to blind-side Sharman:
a) most users of Kazaa does are not too computer savvy and do not know much about the issue of spyware.
b) most computer 'literates' (from non-techies like myself to high-techies) are using open source/no-adware alternatives.
c) most 'high quality' new releases originate from techies (not using Kazaa).
d) somewhere between 10% and 50% of FT supernodes are non-kazaa.

Kazaa users may not understand spyware, but they do understand speed and content availability, so that would be the primary areas of attack on Sharman!

A major sales points of Sharman is speed, so if KaPow users disadvantaged Kazaa users (actually using a reversed Sharman tactic) then Kazaa users would be more likely to search for a Kazaa alternative (imagine if KaPow supernodes were built to give a slight advantage to KaPow users and KaPow clients were built to automatically reduce the speed of uploads to Kazaa users to 50% of what it would have been if the receiving client was a KaPow client).

Another main point of Sharman is the number of users of the FT network, which translates into availability of content for the user. The speed disadvantage mentioned above combined with the assumption that most new 'high-quality' content would originate from KaPow users, would mean that Kazaa users would have easy and fast access to 'junk' files while their access to quality content would be much slower. Another major reason why a Kazaa user would start looking for an alternative.

The main challenge of the KaPow community would be to ensure that it would be easy for Kazaa users to find information about the 'better' alternative. So the main marketing challenge is making sure that a Kazaa user searching for information about an alternative will find KaPow information.

Slyck's calculated number of FT users is 3.9 million, if just 25% (probably low estimate) of those are using Kazaa alternatives that means that there currently is about 1 million users that Sharman cannot control on 'their' network and that 3 million users will need to be converted to KaPow.

Common marketing knowledge says that an unhappy customer on average will complain to about 10-12 others while a happy customer will only tell it to 1-3 other people. Using a simplified calculation where we imagine that one new KaPow user will advocate the program to two new people within the first month of using the program, then 1 new KaPow user will mean 1 KaPow user in month one, 3 KaPow users in month two, 7 KaPow users in month three, 15 KaPow users in month four, 31 KaPow users in month five, 63 KaPow users in month six......

If the target is to convert at least 25% of Kazaa users in the first six months (result: Sharman 50% vs. P2P communit 50%) then, theoretically, KaPow needs about 12,000 converted Kazaa users in the first month!

Nothing is impossible if you have a good product or if you are more ruthless than the competitor
HeWhoThinksTooMuch:)
 

New Website

Postby Thor » Tue Dec 09, 2003 5:09 pm

Thor
 

Postby Guest » Tue Dec 09, 2003 8:42 pm

Down with evil sharman!! :D hehe always wanted to go aignts an evil corporation. :P
Guest
 

Postby _-juCo-_ » Tue Dec 09, 2003 9:14 pm

I've never had a download dissapear with K++ and I am using it right now.

K++ is still working fine for me.
_-juCo-_
 

Next big thing

Postby Guest » Tue Dec 09, 2003 10:19 pm

It seems the big question here is what's next?

From my own experience, I was on Napster until it shut down. Afterwards, I looked at different programs (limewire, bearshare, etc.) before settling on Morpheus like many others. Once Morpheus "upgraded" to its spyware version, it was time to look again. I ended up at Kazaa-Lite like so many of you. It looks like this is another watershed moment when the masses are going to shift to another P2P network. Like before, the best software will bring the biggest user base. What is it going to be?

Options I keep hearing are: Ares, Shareaza, giFT.

Opinions on these? Others? If Kazaa is finished, let's move on.
Guest
 

Postby nobody » Wed Dec 10, 2003 12:07 am

Well, Ares has one major problem --> very limited search horizon.

On Ares, even if there are 60 000 users, your searches are limited to 10 000 nodes. :(

Shareaza, due to it's global search feature, has an unlimited horizon. In shorts it means when there are say 80 000 users on G2, your searches reach the whole network if need be.

Shareaza and Ares both have nice interfaces, though Shareaza has a bag-full of fancy features that only it has.

The fun part about Shareaza is it connects to G2, bearshare, limewire, gnucleus, Morpheus, emule, bittorrent, Ml-donkey.
nobody
 

Postby Guest » Wed Dec 10, 2003 12:23 am

I would say try them all. I have :)

The ones i prefer and provide the best filesharing imo are Shareaza and the current Morpheus alpha series. (Morpheus could very well retake the supremacy it once had)

If k-lite dies, by the way, anybody experiencing problems on k-lite already ?
Guest
 

Postby Guest » Wed Dec 10, 2003 1:32 am

Guest
 

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